Completely Indigenous-designed sweaters at the University of Northern BC – a Canadian first

PRINCE GEORGE, BC – The University of Northern British Columbia says it became the first college or university track program in Canada to unveil an alternative logo and jersey entirely designed by an Indigenous artist .

PRINCE GEORGE, BC – The University of Northern British Columbia says it became the first college or university track program in Canada to unveil an alternative logo and jersey entirely designed by an Indigenous artist .

The new look for the teams at Prince George University in B.C. was unveiled this week at a ceremony attended by UNBC Timberwolves athletes, team and university officials and the creator of the jersey, artist Gitxsan Trevor Angus.

Angus attended college from 2000 to 2003, and says he was delighted to be invited to take on the project because he had been thinking about a jerseys redesign while attending basketball games. during his student years.

He reinterpreted the existing gold and green Timberwolves logo, created custom native piping along the sides of football and basketball uniforms, and added an additional wolf design that is found below the main logo.

The motto of the university, in the Dakelh language, is inscribed on the shoulders of each jersey and means “respect all forms of life”.

The football version of the new shirts debuts this Saturday against visiting Thompson Rivers University, while the Timberwolves basketball team wears the uniform during a game on November 6.

Loralyn Murdoch, director of athletics and recreation at the University of Northern British Columbia, said the collaboration between Angus and the school’s various organizations and donors was “extraordinary.”

“The sense of pride that I hope every student-athlete feels when wearing this uniform is something they will remember forever,” Murdoch told attendees at the ceremony at Masich Place Stadium in Prince George on Wednesday.

Angus says he had a vision for his design before he even started work.

“I loved the whole wolf theme that was already there, and I worked on it. I’ve always thought of the wolf as an animal that works in a pack or a team, so I thought it was such a good fit, ”he said.

He says he was surprised to learn that an Aboriginal design had not been done at another Canadian university or college, “so I’m really proud to hear that, of course.”

The redesign of the uniform shows respect for the land on which the university is located, Angus says.

Murdoch says the detail of each uniform is a “story to hear.”

“I hope this is a story that our athletes, our university and our community are eager to tell.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on October 21, 2021.

(CKPG)

Ethan Ready, The Canadian Press


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